Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 11/5/2017

If you're moving homes, odds are you have a lot on your mind. You're trying to keep track of all your boxes, making sure the moving truck arrives at both locations on time, and focusing on getting all of your belongings to your new home in one piece. In all of this chaos, it's easy to overlook basic safety precautions. If you have a moving day coming up, read these important safety tips to make sure you and your belongings arrive safely.

Packing boxes

  • Practice good lifting technique. It has long been taught that you should "lift with your knees" when picking up heavy objects. However, if you look at the people who lift things for a living, professional weightlifters, you'll notice that they use a combination of muscles.Before lifting, test the weight of the object to see if it's feasible for you to move alone. Then make sure you can get a good grip on the box. When lifting, be sure to keep your chest facing the object and avoid twisting your back. Lift from a squatting position relying mostly on your leg muscles.It's also a good practice to stretch and warm up your back before lifting to avoid injuries.
  • Pack properly. To ensure the safety of you and your possessions during the move, be sure to use boxes that are the correct size and pack them fully. Empty space in boxes can cause them to crush one another and tip over in the moving truck, harming you or your fragile belongings.Double up on tape on the bottom of your boxes and tape a "plus" sign so that the box is reinforced fully. This will stop heavy objects from falling out of the bottom of the box and breaking, and from hurting your feet.

On the road

  • Stack smart, not higher. When stacking boxes, always put the heavier boxes on the bottom. Don't stack them too high or too close to the door of the truck. Think of stacking boxes as playing a game of Tetris--an organized stack will have much better stability than a disorganized one.
  • Test drive the route. Driving in an unfamiliar place is difficult enough without having to do it towing all of your most valued possessions. Travel the route beforehand to get a feel for the roads and for safe places to stop for gas or food.

In your new home

Once you arrive at your new home it's easy to let your guard down and start dreaming about relaxing on the sofa in your empty living room. However, you should ensure the safety of you and your belongings first.
  • Don't leave things unattended. Even if your neighborhood is a safe place you should still keep track of where your boxes are outside at all times.
  • Unpack the truck safely. If you can't reach a box, use a step ladder to get it down. If boxes are too heavy to move, use a dolly.
  • Clear the path. It's easy to lose track of objects and trip over a box in the hallway when carrying your bed frame in. Make sure you and your helpers keep the paths clear while moving.




Tags: Real estate   Safety Tips   home   moving   safety   moving day   house   tips   advice  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 2/14/2016

If you were to guess which area in your home poses the most safety hazards, what would be your answer?  The kitchen?  The basement? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year about 235,000 people over age 15 visit emergency rooms because of injuries suffered in the bathroom, and almost 14 percent are hospitalized. More than a third of the injuries happen while bathing or showering. More than 14 percent occur while using the toilet. By taking some simple steps in your own bathroom, you can cut the risk of serious injury to yourself and your loves ones dramatically.

  • Install support railings right outside of your tub.
  • Put down an anti-slippage mat on the floor of your tub.
  • Take extra care when using electrical outlets in your bathroom. Install a hand towel holder next to outlets, and get in the habit of making sure your hands are dried before plugging and unplugging electrical devices.
  • Be sure that bathroom rugs around your toilet and sink have excellent anti-slip capabilities, and replace your rugs when they become worn.
After following these steps, re-evaluate your bathroom. Can you find anything else that may pose a danger?





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 11/18/2012

Bringing home baby can be stressful but making sure your home is safe for baby is a part of being a new parent. You may think that there isn't much a newborn can do or get into but before you know it your tiny little baby will be toddling around and getting into everything. Here are some quick baby proofing tips to get you started: -Check the crib slats and make sure they are no further than 2 3/8th inches apart. -No soft bedding, blankets or toys in the cribs which can cause suffocation. -Remove hanging cords and secure them from window blinds and treatments. -Plug all electrical outlets. -Set the water heater to no more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. -Install locking lids on all toilets. -Store poisons, including medications in a high cabinet. All medications and toxic chemicals should also have safety lids. -Use foam corners to soften all the hard and sharp corners of tables, the hearth etc. -Install baby proof locks on drawers and cabinets. -Door locks and hinge protectors are also good ideas for doors to rooms and closets. These are just a few tips for baby proofing your home. You can find more information on how to keep kids safe from the American Academy of Pediatrics at HealthyChildren.org.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 10/21/2011

Halloween is just around the corner and knowing how to have fun and stay safe is important. Dressing up in costumes and eating lots of candy is fun but follow these important safety tips for a ghoulishly good time: Young children should never go trick or treating without an adult. Older children should never trick or treat alone, they should always have at least two buddies. Plan your trick or treat route before you go. Carry at least one flashlight and check the batteries. Take a cellular phone and watch with you if possible. Wear flame retardant costumes. Wait until you get home and your parents check your candy before you eat it. Never go inside a house, only accept treats in the doorway. Be weary of strangers trying to talk to you. Walk, do not run. Make sure to stay on sidewalks. Cross the street at the corner or in a crosswalk. Only visit homes that have their lights on. Following these safety tips and common sense will help you make the most of your Halloween season. Please share some of your own Halloween tips and tricks for keeping the holiday enjoyable.




Tags: Halloween   Safety Tips  
Categories: Uncategorized