Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 11/27/2016

For the past several years there has been some confusion over whether it has been a better deal to rent or buy a home. Buying has always been the best long term investment. With the changes in the market it is now clear that in almost any situation buying is the best bet. Rents over the past few years have been on the rise and the demand for rental housing has been shrinking rental availability raising the rents and the competition for acceptable units. Rents have been increasing at about a rate of 2.5 percent a year while home prices have been dropping at about 3.1 percent a year. This makes buying a much better option. Lately, there has been an uptick in the home buying market and in some price ranges inventory is low for prospective buyers. Because prices and mortgage rates remain at all-time lows this is a perfect time to get out of a rental and into your own home. If you are looking for some hard numbers on your own personal financial picture the New York Times has an easy to use calculator that will help you determine how much you will save by buying a home. Click here to use the calculator.




Tags: Buy vs Rent  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 7/26/2015

More and more millennials are getting into the housing market. A survey by homebuilder PulteGroup found that 65% of those who make more than $50,000 a year reported increased interest in buying a home. The recession has forced Generation Y, roughly those age 18 to 34, to delay buying homes. Now millennials are now entering their thirties and the cost of buying a home is now becoming a reality. While student loans and financial resources are keeping some younger people from the housing market many others are realizing that in many cases owning a home is cheaper than renting. The survey also reported that millennials know what they want in a home: 84% listed storage as a priority was ample storage                 76% want space for TV and movie watching                                                                           69% desire an open living/room kitchen layout                                                                             63% look for outdoor living or a deck                                                                                               36% cited the ability to work at home Other recent studies have affirmed the PulteGroup study and have shown that 90% of millennials plan to buy a home someday keeping the dream of homeownership alive.                                                    





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 1/4/2015

Year after year, study after study, good market, down market the story is always the same...owning a home is a good investment. Not only does it build wealth but it also provides many psychological benefits too. A survey released earlier this year by the magazine Better Homes and Gardens found that eight in 10 respondents said homeownership is still a good investment and believe owning a home is a smart financial move and a source of pride. Here are some results of the 2,500 people surveyed online:

  • 86% of home owners still feel owning a home is a good investment.
  • 85% feel “owning a home is one of their proudest accomplishments.”
  • 69% of Americans who don’t currently own a home agree with the statement, “No matter what happens in the U.S. housing market, owning a home is still an important goal in my life.”
  • 68% of Americans plan to spend money on their homes in the next six months, with roughly half (49%) expecting to pay up to $1,000.
 




Categories: Buying a Home   Real estate  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 11/30/2014

You may be considering buying a home but it is hard to know if you are ready to be a homeowner. It can be a big step. Buyers that educate themselves on the process and set realistic expectations have the best experiences. To gauge whether or not you are ready to own your first home you should ask yourself some serious questions.

  • Are you in a lease or is your living situation easily changed?
  • Do you need to remain in your current community or would you be willing to move?
  • Do you have the time and resources necessary to make your first home purchase a success?
If you have answered these questions favorably you may well be on your way to homeownership. The next step is to evaluate your financial situation. Here are some questions to check your financial readiness.
  • Do you have a steady source of income?
  • Do you know your credit history?
  • Do you have a down payment ?
  • Are you ready for the financial responsibilities that coincide with home ownership?
If your answers to these questions are positive then it is time to get the loan process started to see how much you can afford. A reputable lender will give you realistic expectations and many offer a free consultation for buyers seeking pre-approval. Now it is time to start your search. Working with an agent that you trust and are comfortable with is very important. My skills include educating you about the buying process, negotiating, having your best interest in mind and helping you find a perfect first home while hopefully saving you time and money.




Categories: Real estate  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 5/18/2014

Home prices are at rock bottom and mortgage rates at all-time lows so you may be considering going from renter to homeowner. If you are planning on staying put for a while the choice makes sense. There are a few things to take into consideration before you make the leap from renter to owner. First, you will need to determine how much you can afford. Consult with a mortgage professional to help you determine what kind of mortgage you qualify for. Just because you pay $1,000 a month in rent, doesn't mean you can handle a $1,000 monthly mortgage payment. There are more costs to owning a home than just the mortgage payment. As a homeowner you will also be responsible for property tax, home insurance, utilities, and repairs. To prepare for those costs plan on adding about 40 percent to your base cost. So, if your mortgage is $1,000, add about $400 a month for a better estimate of costs. Before you make a rash decision see if you really can afford the cost difference. Once you know the cost difference spend a few months depositing the difference between your rent payment and your cost estimate in the bank. In the previous example you would deposit $400 a month into savings. If you've been able to keep up the deposits and pay your other bills, that's a sign you can afford to buy. Now that you have been saving more you have more money to put toward the down payment of your new home. These are just a few tips to get you started. Once you have a better financial picture it will be time to start shopping. That is when the fun begins.