Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 11/3/2013

To buy or not to buy that is the question. There are reasons for or against homeownership on both sides of the fence. So here are the pros and cons of buying a home. You decide... Pros: 1. It Costs Less- With record low interest rates, and low home prices a mortgage payment on a house can be less than a rental payments. 2. Equity -If you own a home rather than rent you are building equity. If you pay rent you have nothing to show for it. If you own a home you are building equity. Even if housing prices stay flat part of your mortgage payment goes towards the principal balance and eventually you will own the home. Cons: 1. You Could Get a Better Money Return-A home may not be the best return on your money. You may find a better return on capital in the stock market. If you are just looking at it in a strictly financial way there are better investment strategies. Historically, the S&P 500 has returned an average of 13.4% -- 4.8% higher than the 8.6% average return on housing. 2. It is a Big Commitment-You can't just sell your house and move quickly. It is a long term decision. If you job requires frequent moves this can be a significant consideration. Now that you have seen some of the pros and cons the decision is ultimately up to you and what is best in your circumstance. The pros cannot be disputed. Low rates and prices almost make buying a no-brainer if it fits within your financial situation.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 9/15/2013

There are so many things to think of when buying a home. It can be difficult to think of everything when you are house shopping. When you tour potential homes it can be easy to get caught up in things that may not be as important after you move in like storage, parking, and privacy. When home shopping you should make a checklist of the things you must have in a home so you don't get caught up in the new granite countertops or the beautifully decorated master bedroom. Think function over style when making a buying decision. Here are some things you may want to consider putting on your must-have list. Storage When walking through a home make sure to make note of the amount of storage. A good staging job can disguise a home with too little storage. Imagine the home with no furniture and picture your furniture and belongings in place. If you are seriously interested in the home bring a sketch pad and measure the rooms and draw a quick sketch of walls, doors, windows and closets. Location Consider the location of the home to places you frequently travel. You may only be a few miles from the store or work but what is the commute like? Do a practice run at rush hour from the home to your work. If you are moving near public transportation give that a try too. Make sure to try the commute both ways. Enough Power and Water Imagine waking up the first morning in your new home and finding out the water pressure is barely enough for a shower or the water gets cold half way through.  It is important to determine if the plumbing and wiring can accommodate your lifestyle. Check the size of the hot water tank and run a few plumbing items at a time to check the water pressure. Talk to your home inspector about the electrical system. Make sure the home inspector knows the kinds of electrical equipment you run and the number of people that will be living in the home. Privacy Many buyers overlook privacy until it's too late. Try to spend some time in the house. Look out the bathroom and bedroom windows and test what you see. Do a walk-through of the home and pretend to go through your day. Sit in the back yard and on the deck to see and listen to the neighbors.




Categories: Buying a Home  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 6/23/2013

You may think buying a short sale is a good deal and many times it can be a good option. Short sales can also be fraught with complications and often can easily fall apart. Here is a list of things to be aware of so your short sale doesn't become a long shot. • When a house is placed for sale as a short sale the owner doesn't always have the authority to sell the house at the advertised price. The owner hopes the bank will accept that price as a short sale. • The negotiating process is far different than a regular sale. You often will first negotiate with a seller but remember the bank has the final say-so. • You are making an offer to purchase blind because many lenders will not even discuss a short sale with a seller until a purchase contract is in place. There is no guarantee the lender will even accept a short-sale offer. • Short sales often are not short at all. They can be long, drawn-out affairs. Be prepared for it to take months. • Even though the lender may have taken their time on the short sale approval, once approved the lender often require the sale to close within a short period of time. Due to the way many short sales happen, a buyer may have to put out money for a home inspection, appraisal, credit report and application fees paid to their lender and the sale may not even happen. So while short sales can often be a good deal they can also be a long shot. Take your time, do your research and be sure to work with a real estate professional to help guide you through the potential pitfalls of a short sale.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 12/9/2012

You've been thinking about buying your first home and it is a very big decision. It is typically not a decision you make overnight instead you need to take the time prepare yourself.  Here are the basic steps that you should follow when it is time to buy a home.

  1. Ask are you ready? Home ownership is quite different than renting. It is a lot more expensive than renting. You will have added expenses and responsibility. There will be expenses like repairs, added utility costs, such as garbage and water, plus taxes and insurance related to your home. You will want to make sure to have an emergency fund, before you purchase your first home.
  2. Shop for a loan. Your first step will be to get preapproved. Knowing how much you can afford will help you to look for homes within your price range.
  3. Figure out how much you can afford. Just because you are preapproved for a certain loan doesn't mean you can afford that in the real world. A good rule of thumb is to keep your mortgage along with your taxes and insurance between twenty five and thirty percent of your income. You don't want to be house poor.
  4. Use a real estate professional you can trust.  A good real estate professional will listen to your wants and needs carefully. It is important that you are also educated on the process of buying a home. A good real estate professional will help meet your needs while navigating you through the process and advocating for your best interests.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 12/2/2012

A home is a very big purchase in your life and one of the most important things you can do before you buy your new home. It can be difficult to find a qualified home inspector. You will want to make sure to do your homework before paying for a home inspection. Here are some tips to help you get on the right track and finding the right home inspector. Ask for opinions. Ask your friends and your real estate agent who they recommend who have had an inspection recently. You can also ask the inspector for references. Word of mouth is always a great way to find a reliable professional. Check with your lender Some lenders or loan types require a certain type of inspection. You will want to make sure your inspector qualifies and you obtain the necessary type of inspection. Ask what the inspection covers No two home inspections are the same so you will want to be sure to know what you are paying for. Ask questions like:

  • What systems are covered in the home inspection?
  • Are there some services that require an extra fee?
  • Ask for an example or outline of the inspection report.
  • Ask for a resume or background questions
  • Where was the inspector trained?
  • Does he or she attend continuing education classes?
  • Does the inspector belong to a professional organization? If so, what are the requirements for membership? Entry should require more than just an application fee.
  • Does the inspector carry Errors & Omissions insurance? This type of malpractice insurance may come in handy if the inspector overlooks a major problem.
  • At the inspection A home inspection is not only a time to find the potential pitfalls it can also be a time to learn about your new home. Make sure to attend the inspection yourself. Witnessing problems first-hand will give you a better grasp of the home.   .