Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 7/6/2014

Baking soda is not just for baking. It has many uses in your home from removing stains to treating burns and bites. Here are some great tips for home uses of baking soda: Just one-teaspoon baking soda to one quart of warm water will clean your refrigerator. Unclog your drain with a cup of baking soda. Pour it into the opening of your drain and then add a cup of hot vinegar. Wait a few minutes, flush the drain with a quart of boiling water. Keep the pests out of your home by laying down barrier of baking soda under sink-pipe openings and along basement windows. Relieve sunburned or itchy skin by adding baking soda to your bath water. A paste of baking soda and water applied to a burn or an insect bite will provide relief. Clean your toothbrush by soaking it in baking soda and warm water overnight. A paste of baking soda and water will remove stains from your coffee and tea cups, and red sauce stains from plastic containers. Post your own baking soda tips below.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 6/8/2014

Polishing a hardware floor can be a daunting task and most of the hardwood polish you may have been using is toxic, and not to mention expensive.  You can go natural and make your own polish at home. Here are a few homemade wood floor polish recipes:

Recipe I Ingredients: 1/2 cup vinegar 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1. Mix the ingredients well. 2. Rub on the floor, and buff with a clean, dry cloth.
Recipe II Ingredients: 1/4 cup of grated beeswax boiling water 1/4 cup of turpentine fruit extract (if desired) 1. Put the beeswax into a bowl. 2. Put the bowl with the beeswax into a pan of boiling water until the beeswax has melted. 3. Add the turpentine into the beeswax and stir continuously until it all starts to cool. 4. If desired add fruit extract to give it a pleasant smell. 5. Apply the polish to a clean floor using a sponge, wipe off extra polish and leave the floor to dry itself for 12-24 hours.
 





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 6/1/2014

The summer is here! No more teachers, no more books and the kids need something to do. School may be out but summer is a great time for all kinds of learning opportunities for kids. Here are some activities to help families create some fun, enriching summertime learning. Look for active learning experiences Check with your local department of parks and recreation about camps and other activities. There are many free exhibits, events, or concerts happening in your town over the summer. Build reading and writing into everyday activities You can incorporate reading into everyday activities. Try watching TV with the sound off and closed captioning on. Have your child read the directions for how to play a new game. Children can help make to do lists or help with meals by reading a cookbook and write up a grocery list. Encourage writing Have kids write letters and postcards to their friends and family telling of their summertime adventures. Try blogging! Arrange for a safe, closed blog so that you can blog over the summer. Be an active citizen Find community service organizations. Kids who participate in community service activities gain not only new skills but self-confidence and self-esteem. Get into geocaching Everyone loves a scavenger hunt! Get in on the latest outdoor craze with geocaching, where families search for hidden "caches" or containers using handheld GPS tools (or a GPS app on your smart phone).  




Categories: Help Around the House  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 5/11/2014

Have you every hooked up the garden hose only to find more water is coming from the spigot than the end of the hose? Don't throw away your hose fixing a leaky hose is easier than you think. Here is how to make a simple, inexpensive repair to get your hose back in working order: What you need: Coupling Mender Knife Tape Washer If the leak is from the spigot: If your hose is leaking from the spigot it is usually the washer that has dried out or deteriorated with age.  Simply remove the old washer, and pop in a new washer. If the hose is still leaking, try replacing the coupling. If your hose has a small leak: Clean and dry the area of the leak in the hose. Use common electrical tape or specially designed hose repair tape to mend the leak. Overlap the tape while wrapping it around the hose. If your hose has a large leak: A large leak is a little more difficult to repair. Cut out the damaged section of the hose and replace it with a mender. Use a sharp blade and straight cuts on the hose. Take the removed portion of the hose with you when purchasing the replacement because parts differ by manufacturer. Follow these steps: Clean and dry the hose. Rub soap on the area you're repairing. This will make it more pliable and easier to work with. Carefully cut out the damaged portion of the hose with a sharp knife and leave the ends as square as possible. Loosen the screws on both sides of the replacement coupler. Fully insert the cut end of each section of hose into one side of the clamp mender. Evenly tighten the screws until the clamp is tight. Attach the hose to a sprinkler or nozzle, and turn on the water to test the connection. If water leaks out, tighten the connection until water no longer leaks.  





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 5/4/2014

Old and dried out PointsetaAre you a plant killer?  If so, don't feel discouraged.  Many people looking to add a touch of green to their homes end up on the "most wanted" list.  Luckily for them (and perhaps you as well), plant killing isn't a crime.  Also, there are a few plants that can survive even the most neglectful of plant keepers.  If you think that keeping houseplants healthy is out of your league, then give these hardy friends a chance to shine in your home. Air Plants - Also known as Epiphytes, these plants derive most, if not all of the moisture and nutrients they need from the air.  They can be put almost anywhere in your home, and are virtually indestructible.  These plants don't even need soil.  At most, they'll need a light mist every few months. Succulents - These plants are known for their large, fleshy, unusual appearance.  A common misconception about Succulents is that they are cacti.  While it is true that most cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti.  They are relatively cheap to purchase, and once rooted, can be a beautiful addition to your home.  Given the abundance of varieties to choose from, odds are you'll be able to find a succulent that complements any home style. Aloe - Not only is aloe a succulent, it is one of only a few plants that can be kept for not only decorative purposes, but medicinal as well.  The gel in aloe vera plants has been used for skin irritations, such as cuts and burns.  The gel can also be processed into soaps. Jade - Jade is also a succulent, and can be a beautiful addition to your home.  Many jade plants are purchased as bonsai trees, and upkeep is minimal.  While not as hardy as the other plants on the list, this is a good plant to take a shot at after you've managed to keep a few air plants and hardier succulents alive. Golden Pothos - Not only is this plant incredibly hardy, it also qualifies as an "air scrubber", removing toxins from the air in your home.  Trimmings can easily be cultivated into plants, and the rate of growth can be incredibly fast.  Care should be taken to avoid ingestion by pets and children.