Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 11/25/2012

Cold and flu season are here, there are some ways to prevent getting sick and they can come from simply changing your diet. It may not be an apple a day keeps the doctor away but there are some foods you can add to your diet to keep the cold bugs at bay.

Acai Berry

Acai berry's dark color signals that it is high in antioxidants called anthocyanins. Antioxidants help your body fight aging and disease. Acai berries are usually found in juice or smoothie form, or dried and mixed with granola.

Almonds

Just 1/4 cup of Almonds has almost 50% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin E. Vitamin E helps boost the immune system. Almonds also contain riboflavin and niacin; B vitamins that may help you bounce back from the effects of stress.

Grapefruit

If you are looking to boost your vitamin C intake, grapefruits are a great way to fights off colds and flu. Grapefruit is also packed with flavonoids. Flavonoids are natural chemical compounds that have been shown to increase immune system activation.

Wheat Germ

Wheat germ contains zinc, antioxidants, and B vitamins among other vital vitamins and minerals. Wheat germ has fiber, protein, and good fat. You can substitute wheat germ for some part of regular flour in baked goods and other recipes. You can also mix it in with breadcrumbs in meatballs or meatloaf.

Oysters

When you hear oyster you think aphrodisiac but oysters are also known as immune boosters. Oysters contain the mineral zinc. Zinc has an antiviral effect, which aids in healing wounds.

Cabbage

Cabbage is a fantastic source of immune-strengthening glutamine.  It is easy to add cabbage to soups and stews to boost nutritional value.

Watermelon

Also containing the powerful antioxidant glutathione is watermelon. Glutathione is found in the red pulpy flesh near the rind.

Elderberry

Rich in antioxidants, elderberry is thought to fight inflammation. The extract from these dark berries appears to block flu viruses in test tube studies.

Button Mushrooms

Mushrooms boast the mineral selenium and antioxidants. Boosting selenium levels help to fight off severe flu symptoms. The B vitamins riboflavin and niacin, also found in these mushrooms, play a role in a healthy immune system.    





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 7/8/2012

Did you know that your kids can lose from one to three months of learning over the summer? Studies suggest kids lose the most in math. Don't spend the summer going in reverse. There are many online sites that can help stop the summer brain drain. National Geographic Kids: offers great nature videos, activities, games, stories, and more CoolMath4Kids: take a trip through an amusement park of math and more at this extremely interactive math website Smithsonian Kids Collecting: how to start your own collection and see what other kids collect Explore Dinosaurs: FAQs and top 10 myths about dinosaurs, a virtual dig, behind the scenes tours, and more from the National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Digging for Answers: a site that tests your research skills and knowledge NASA Quest: interactive explorations that engage students in real science and engineering. Topics include robots, helicopters, lunar exploration, and designing your own human-friendly planet My Wonderful World: a multimedia tour of our seven continents Time for Kids: fun games (The Great State Race), an online weekly magazine written for kids, and news from around the world Big Universe: an online library of fiction and nonfiction books for kids 0-12. The site also offers adults and kids the chance to create and publish their own stories.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 4/29/2012

Sleep; it is so good for us but for many it can be so hard to achieve. Believe it or not your lack of sleep may be coming from the foods you eat. This article from Caring.com says avoid these five foods that can *prevent* you from getting a good night's rest: 1. Preserved and smoked meats Slap your hand away when it reaches to make a ham sandwich as an evening snack. Ham, bacon, sausages, and smoked meats contain high levels of the amino acid tyramine, which triggers the brain to release norepinephrine, a brain stimulant that makes us feel alert and wired. 2. Chocolate Love an evening cup of cocoa? That sundae in front of the TV? Be careful of chocolate in all its disguises. Many people are increasingly sensitive to caffeine as they get older, and even the little chocolate chunks in chocolate chip ice cream could zap you just enough to prevent ZZZZs. Chocolate also contains tyrosine, a stimulating amino acid. 3. Energy drinks Red Bull and other energy drinks are high in caffeine as well as the amino acid taurine, which boosts alertness and adrenaline. Recent studies have shown that even if you drink energy drinks early in the day, the combined high dosage of taurine and caffeine can make it hard to sleep, or to sleep well, later on. 4. Tomato sauce, chili, pizza, and spicy foods Digestive disturbances are a common source of sleep problems, but many people fail to make the connection. Acidic and spicy foods can cause reflux, heartburn, and other symptoms that interrupt sleep. 5. The nightcap A drink or two may make you feel more relaxed after dinner, but it comes back to haunt you -- literally -- a few hours later, by preventing you from achieving deep sleep. And because alcohol both dehydrates you and makes you have to pee, it wakes you up, too. Wine is high in the stimulant tyrosine as well.




Categories: To Your Health