Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 3/5/2017

Buying a vacation home is something that many dream of, but for some it’s not just a dream. And it’s certainly not something that is only for the rich and the famous. Maybe you have been saving for one your whole life, got a large bonus at work that you want to use as a down payment, or are just going out on a limb; there are several things to consider before taking the plunge and buying a vacation home. Cost: First and foremost, what kind of financial position are you in? Are you able to put down 20% and if not will you be able to afford the potential higher interest rate that goes along with less money done? If you are planning to buy farther away, can you afford the airfare cost for as often as you’d like to spend there? Can you afford the inevitable maintenance that will be necessary? You certainly do not have to be a millionaire to purchase a vacation home, but it’s important to know what you can afford and cannot afford. Location: Do you want to buy a vacation home that is within a couple of hours from your home? Or would you rather buy one a plane ride away that may be in a location that’s warm year round? Or do you want to buy a home in another country? This is certainly something that should be determined before beginning your search. Condo vs. Single-Family: Do you want the privacy of a single-family home or do you want the amenities that come along with living in a condo? There is a level of privacy that comes with owning a single-family home versus a condo, as well as there are condo fees to consider. This decision may not matter much to you, but it’s important that everyone involved agrees on the type of home they would like to buy. Rent It: Do you plan on renting out your vacation home when you are not there? Are you looking at homes in locations where renting is possible? Can you afford the home if you do not rent it out? If you can’t afford the home without renting, how often do you need to rent to be able to afford it? Do you want the hassle of renting it? It’s important to consider this possibility even before you begin your house hunt. Buying a vacation home is extremely exciting, but it’s a large investment. It should be well thought out and planned out. But, once you have those details worked out— go out and buy the vacation home of your dreams!





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 12/18/2016

The housing market presents many opportunities for homebuyers. And after the right amount of research, you're sure to find plenty of exceptional houses that suit you well. But how do you know when you're ready to submit an offer on a residence? Determining the "perfect" offer for a house is key, and if you feel comfortable with your proposal, you may be better equipped to receive a resounding "Yes" from a home seller. Improve your chances of submitting the perfect offer on a residence – here are three tips that you can use to submit the right offer on a home: 1. Consider the Home Seller's Perspective. Of course, when you submit an offer, you likely want to make a proposal that fits your needs and budget. On the other hand, you must consider the home seller and ensure your offer represents a fair deal for both sides. If you submit a "lowball" proposal, there's a strong chance that a home seller will reject it immediately. Conversely, if you submit an above-average proposal, you may wind up paying a price that exceeds your budget. To make the right offer, evaluate the home seller's price as well as the price of similar homes in an area. By doing so, you'll be better equipped to make an offer that corresponds to the current housing market. Also, don't be afraid to discuss your proposal options with your real estate agent, as this professional may be able to offer insights that you can use to boost your chances of getting a "Yes" from a home seller. 2. Prepare for Plan B. Even if you consider your offer to be fair for both you and a home seller, there are no guarantees that a home seller will feel the same way. Thus, you need to be prepared to act quickly in the event that a home seller declines your offer. If a home seller says "No" to your proposal, you can always submit another offer. Or, you may want to consider moving on and evaluating other homes that are available. 3. Be Realistic. It is essential to feel comfortable with an offer you submit on a house. And the moment things start to make you feel anxious, you may want to reconsider your options. For example, a home seller may counter your initial proposal, but you might lack the finances to meet this seller's expectations. In this scenario, you should be unafraid to walk away. That way, you can avoid the dangers associated with over-extending your budget, which could put you in a tough financial position down the line. Remember, the perfect offer on a residence is one that fulfills the needs of both a homebuyer and home seller. If you feel uncomfortable with a home seller's counter offer, you need to understand the situation and act accordingly. Submitting the perfect offer can be tricky, especially if you're dealing with a home seller who sets the bar high for his or her residence. Fortunately, your real estate agent can help you alleviate the stress commonly associated with making an offer and ensure you are fully supported throughout the homebuying process. Work toward submitting the perfect offer on a home, and you can bolster your chances of a home seller accepting your proposal.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 8/7/2016

real estate shopping onlineSellers beware! Most sellers realize there will be a bit of negotiation once an Offer to Purchase is made on their property. Sellers may receive an offer that is lower than what their property is listed at. In this case it is common for the seller to counter that offer, the counter to be accepted or denied at the discretion of the potential buyer. Due to the anticipated negotiation process, it may seem like it would make sense to put your house into MLS at a value far over the value that you understand your property is worth. Sellers feel that if their end game is receiving X amount of money for their house, if they list it at X+15, and after negotiations accept their originally desired amount of X, it seems like they participated willingly in negotiations and accepted below asking price for the sake of the buyer. This idea is good in theory, but does not actually work to the benefit of the seller for the following reason: Listing your house at the exact price you're looking to receive allows for maximum exposure potential via MLS. In order to search for a listing on MLS, you must enter a minimum and maximum price range. Buyers seeking homes at your desired price of X will not see your listing in their MLS search because of the additional 15 you've added to your listing price. Their search will be cut short at X and as a seller, you will lose potential buyers. For more information on allowing for maximum exposure potential for your property please contact me!





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 2/28/2016

The housing market has been heating up and lately there seems to be more buyers than homes. So where do you start when house hunting? Many buyers like to start at Open Houses to get a feel for the market. It is always best to try to find a real estate agent to help guide you through the buying process , however, if you want to try to get your feet wet first an Open House might be your best bet. There are some things you will want to know about how to tackle an Open House: 1. How do you find Open Houses? Your best bet is to find a real estate professional that represents buyers and have them help you find Open Houses that are right for you. Agents are familiar with the inventory and could save you an unnecessary trip to a house that isn't right for you. Most open houses take place on Saturday or Sunday, so Thursday is a good day to start your search. 2. Be prepared Plan your route, make sure you have the right directions and have plenty of gas to get where you are going. Take along a pen and paper to make notes on properties. 3. Get to know the area The house may be great; but how is the area? Take the time to drive around the surrounding neighborhoods of homes you like and get to know the area. A real estate professional is a great resource for community information. 4. Check for agency Most agents at an Open House represent the seller. You will want to work with an agent that is able to represent you as the buyer. If you like the agent at the Open House, and have not yet contracted with an agent, make sure to discuss agency and representation. 5. Take notes Take notes and write down a list of quick pros and cons after you have viewed a home. This will help you remember the houses you have viewed. Viewing Open Houses can help you get a sense for what’s out there in the marketplace. It will help you determine if the house you want and your finances match up with the houses that are on the market. It is always best to find a real estate professional to help you find the home of your dreams. Buying a home is no small matter.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 1/31/2016

Some people think that bigger is better even when it comes to buying a home. Before you buy the biggest house your budget allows you may want to consider if the size of the home is what will make you a happy homeowner. Besides the size of the home there are many other factors to consider, here are a few things you may want to think about when buying: Your Commute Often times a bigger home is one that has a longer commute. So would you choose a bigger home over a shorter commute? When considering a longer commute most home buyers significantly underestimate the negatives of a long commute like high stress levels, poorer health, and less active social lives.  Swiss economists, Bruno Frey and Alois Stutzer coined what they call “the commuters paradox”. They found that someone with a one-hour commute must earn 40% more money than someone who walks to work to be as satisfied with life. Community Another thing that can affect buyer satisfaction is the quality of a surrounding community Think about the community your home would be in. Is it a subdivision? Do you have to drive to get places? How far away are neighbors or stores? Walkable communities have more active residents, they are better for the environment and help us save money too. Studies have shown residents of a walkable neighborhood on average weigh 6 to 10 pounds less than someone in a car-dependent one. Walkable neighborhoods also give us more opportunities for social interaction. The more neighbors walk around the more involved they are in the community. Ultimately the more community involvement the happier people are.