Thomas Murphy - Pine Shores Real Estate



Posted by Thomas Murphy on 10/12/2014

If you happen to find yourself moving to another state in the near future, you've got your work cut out for you. On top of having to deal with the stress of relocating your family in an unfamiliar place, you'll have a lot of paperwork and research to consider before the big day. Here are four things that you'll need to have covered if you hope to have a seamless transition into a new residence. Keep in mind that the more bases you've got covered, the easier it will be for you and your family to get accustomed to a new state. 1. Cost of living. - The cost of living can vary dramatically from state to state. If you're moving for a new job, then make sure to research the cost of living close to your new place of employment. If you lived in a metropolitan area before, then it may serve you better to move to a town surrounding the city and pull a commute than to take a gamble at throwing yourself into a new city that may upset your current lifestyle. Alternately, you may find that the state you are moving to has a fairly low cost of living in the metropolitan areas compared to what you are used to paying. Every state is different in this regard. Doing the research now will save you major headaches. 2. Moving companies. - Unless you are packing up all of your belongings yourself, odds are that you will be relying on a long-distance moving company to handle most of the work. Prices of this service can very dramatically from company to company, so be sure to get at least three quotes from reputable moving companies as to ensure you're getting the best deal. Also, make room in your budget for an insurance plan that you are comfortable paying for. The last thing you'll want to deal with during your move is the worry of your possessions being damaged with no recourse. 3. Taxes. - You may not think that taxes are an important thing to consider this early in the game, but if you live in a state that doesn't collect an income tax, moving to a state that does can impact your cost of living. Meet with a tax specialist and review any hidden taxes and expenses you may incur as a result of your move so you aren't surprised later on down the road. 4. Neighborhoods and local culture. - This may be one of the most important steps that a lot of people overlook. Just because you do a virtual walk through of a home and like what you see, doesn't mean you'll like where you're moving. Do some detective work before you sign papers. Look into crime statistics, school ratings, reviews of the city and neighborhood you're considering moving to, and local taxes and ordinances. You can find all of this information online relatively easy. If you can manage it, then plan a visit to your potential new home to see everything your new town will have to offer. Look at the commute to your new place of employment, the sights and sounds of the local culture, and keep an eye out for anything you don't particularly like about a place. You can make your transition a lot smoother by connecting with a reputable real estate agent who has a healthy knowledge of the area.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 6/29/2014

If you are moving soon you have probably thought about packing, hiring a mover and moving day but, have you considered what to do after the move? After the money has changed hands and the boxes are piled up in your new home, the question is... now what? 1. Create a game plan for unpacking First determine which rooms you will unpack first. You may want to choose one room to unpack and make feel "homey" before moving on to other areas of the house. This way you will have one room in your new home that feels settled. 2. Make the kids feel at home If you have kids you might want to put unpacking a "kid zone" at the top of your priority list. Moving can be stressful on children. Set up space with their familiar items to help make them feel at home in the new house. 3. Meet the neighbors Take time to introduce yourself to the neighbors. Become involved in area events and activities as soon as you can. Sign the kids up for sports, after-school activities or other community events. Buying a new home and making the move can be stressful, but it is what comes after the move that matters most.




Tags: moving tips  
Categories: Moving Tips  


Posted by Thomas Murphy on 10/6/2013

Friendly Moving CompanyIf you've never heard of a moving scam, then consider yourself lucky. But many people across America are falling victim to these scams. Moving scammers have a multitude of ways that they can take advantage of you. The main scam seems to be packing all of your household items into their truck, and then adding on exorbitant additional fees in transit, effectively holding your items hostage until you pay up. Less popular scams involve unlicensed movers posing as legitimate companies, by-the-hour rates where you are charged even while no work is being done, and in the rare case, a sham company showing up, packing up all of your possessions, and driving away, never to be heard from again.To minimize your risk, follow a few simple guidelines.

  • Use a local, reputable business.
  • Never do business with a broker. Always do business with the actual moving company.
  • Always be sure that the company is licensed to do the work they are to be performing. This includes getting the business's full name and address, motor carrier (MC) and Department of Transportation (DOT) license numbers, phone numbers and an e-mail address. If a company cannot provide you access to these things, then move on.
  • Be sure to use a company with actual employees, and not day laborers. If they use day laborers, there is a chance that they may not have the proper insurance in place.
Additionally, be sure to get any estimates in paper form. They are legally obligated to do so, and if they balk at the idea, then it's time for you to move on, and find a company that will play by the rules.





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 3/3/2013

There comes a time when families start to think about senior members moving. Factors such as retirement, finances, lifestyle, health or the distance between family members are just a few of the reasons why seniors may decide to relocate. Moving is a big decision especially when a senior has lived in one place for a very long time. Many things must be considered, including access to health care, recreation, social activities and practical concerns, such as grocery stores, libraries, climate, etc. Access to Quality Care For many seniors access to health care or options for health care assistance is the primary reason for moving. When considering options it is important look at the short-term solutions, but also consider long term scenarios. Options may include drop-in help, moving closer to a family member that can assist when needed or retirement communities that offer fully independent living to supportive assistance as required. Community Services It is also important to research the area community services. You will want to make note of services such as homecare, cleaning services, snow removal, transportation and home repair. Some individuals may want access to volunteer organizations or senior centers where they can be involved in the community. Support As an older adult, moving is an especially difficult transition. Finding the support the senior needs in the new community is imperative. Groups that seniors can connect with will help the transition go smoother. Connect with church groups, home visit solutions or perhaps meetings that would be conducted in a home setting. Here are some websites that may help you in your transition: Eldercare Locator AARP Elder Web: Online Eldercare Sourcebook American Society on Aging (ASA) Senior Resource Housing: Information on Housing Options





Posted by Thomas Murphy on 1/22/2012

The thermometer is dipping and you still have to plan your move. A winter move can go smoothly with the right preparation and a little cooperation from Mother Nature. If possible try to plan to be flexible in case of bad weather. Plan to move towards the end of winter, and you may just get an unusually warm day. The upside of a cold weather move is that moving companies are not as busy and usually accommodate the dates you want to move. The move may also cost you less because the demand is low so try to negotiate with the moving company for a better deal. When hiring movers, ask them what precautions they have for a winter move. Ask about their rescheduling policy for bad weather. Your belongings also need special cold weather precautions. Wood furniture may be vulnerable to cracking in colder temperatures. Electronics have sensitive parts that can be destroyed by moisture and cold. Plants can freeze in extreme cold, so its best to pack them in the back seat. Winter can be tough but with some planning and preparation, you can ensure that your winter move proceeds smoothly and without any interruption.